Interest groups developed and organized by faculty and students play a particularly active role in the life of the Centre.  These groups maintain their own listserve and organize regular discussions and seminars.  This is a great way to meet and discuss issues of common interest and perhaps even find new collaborations.  If you would like to propose a new interest group please contact the Director.

FAUNA

The Zooarchaeology Interest Group has convened biweekly (Fridays from 11am to 1pm in the Archaeology Centre Board Room, AP140) since September 2007. We discuss new and old issues of zooarchaeological method and theory. We also host guest lecturers and provide a casual arena for our group members to present and receive input on their own research. Anyone who is interested in participating or attending these meetings can contact Dr. Genevieve Dewar ( genevieve.dewar@utoronto.ca) for further information.

CERAMICS

The Ceramics Interest Group is aimed at anyone working with, or interested in learning more about, ceramic artefacts, such as pottery, clay figurines or even architectural artefacts. Ceramics often form the most abundant traces of human activity in the archaeological record, as well as providing useful studies for ethnoarchaeological research, and experimental approaches, within current anthropology and archaeology. This interest group attracts a wide range of researchers, willing to share and explore the multidisciplinary techniques required to understand these complex facets of material culture. If you are interested in participating, please contact Stanley Klassen ( stanley.klassen@utoronto.ca) for more details.

CULTURAL

HERITAGE

The Cultural Heritage Interest Group of the University of Toronto's Archaeology Centre is dedicated to connecting and expanding scholarly and public discussions on the many issues surrounding the world's cultural heritage. Issues such as the trade, collection and repatriation of artifacts, the political appropriation or destruction of cultural heritage, and the heritage concerns of indigenous peoples, descendant groups and others are central to archaeology and link the discipline to diverse publics, including policymakers, museum professionals, community members, developers, law enforcement officers, resource managers, academics, and other stakeholders.

Contact: Justin Jennings ( justinj@rom.on.ca) and Lena Mortensen ( mortensen@utsc.utoronto.ca)

 

        GIS

 

The Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Interest Group is aimed at providing a forum for the discussion of all matters relating to applications of GIS technology in archaeological research, as well as archaeoinformatics more generally.  This group is intended for people with any level of background in GIS, and will accommodate familiarities with both open source and proprietary software packages.  Discussions are tailored to the needs of the group and typically revolve around related readings assigned in advance of the biweekly meetings.  GIS has become much more commonly used in archaeological research and management spheres of late, yielding a diverse range of applications from which to discuss both practical and theoretical aspects of the technology.

 LITHICS

The Lithics Interest Group is open to anyone who would like to learn about and make stone tools. We have biweekly journal discussion and research talks with the occasional guest speaker, and we practice flintknapping. The Group has a global focus open to a wide range of technological method and theory topics. Anyone with an interest in stone tool technology and learning to flintknapp is encouraged to attend! For more information contact Amy Fox (amy.fox@mail.utoronto.ca) or check the calendar to stop by our next event.

 FOOD AND SUBSISTENCE

The Food and Subsistence Interest Group is an interdisciplinary effort to bring together researchers interested in topics like subsistence strategies, food production, diet reconstruction, and sociocultural studies of food. Food is a central component of human survival, cultural organization, and social identity. Although everyone must eat, the ways in which societies meet this need are as varied as the anthropological methods to study food practices. We will meet biweekly beginning in January 2015 to discuss journal articles, review theory and methods, and present research from a variety of geographical and temporal contexts. This group welcomes anthropologists from all sub-fields who have an interest in food and can bring cross-cultural insights from their own work and experience. Contact: Lindi Masur (lindi.masur@mail.utoronto.ca) for more information

ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY

 

 

The Archaeology Theory Interest Group was founded as a forum for discussion of the most recent theoretical approaches, including a wide variety of topics from innovative theoretical perspectives within our field, to new theoretical developments across the humanities and social sciences, forays into human-computer interaction, artificial life, space exploration and much more. Our mission is to make theory accessible and fun for everybody, regardless of their academic background, to encourage students to take creative theoretical approaches in their research, regardless of the subfield and time period they are working in and to foster interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary discussion. Members meet biweekly to discuss an article or other type of media, share ideas and listen to occasional guest speakers.  Please contact Paulina Scheck (Paulina.scheck@mail.utoronto.ca) for further information.

 

 

The Archaeology Centre, 19 Russell St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S2.    email:  archaeology@utoronto.ca

The Archaeological Sciences Interest Group acts as a medium for bringing together researchers, scholars, and students from a number of academic disciplines – as well as individuals from the general public – with backgrounds or interests in the archaeological sciences and/or related fields. The Archaeological Sciences Interest Group strives towards three main objectives: 1) to highlight ongoing archaeological sciences research through open lectures, seminars, and forums; 2) to help individuals develop the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary to carry out their own research in archaeological sciences through hands-on practical/tutorial sessions on related research methods and analytical techniques; and 3) to generally advocate for archaeological sciences as a growing and global academic discipline, as well as promote further archaeological sciences research at the University of Toronto and elsewhere. If you would like to be added to the interest group’s e-mail list serv., or seek further information about the interest group, please contact Branden Rizzuto (branden.rizzuto@mail.utoronto.ca) for further information.